LOVERS LOVE CRAFTS

Valentine's Day seems to the the craftiest day for the crafters, grannies and your favorite Aunt Elma. However I just like the quirky tableware, so that being said there are a ton of fun inexpensive used and handmade options on Ebay & Etsy. Why buy new when you can repurpose something fun? I recommend searching for pink milk glass, pink depression era glass or my personal favorite fun find... FIORUCCI plates, because when I think of angels, pink and love, I think of the 80's iconic brand. 

Lenneke Wispelwey, You Are Gorgeous!

About Lenneke Wispelwey: Her pastel colored products with mathematic/geometric patterns are the result of a very low-tech way of designing. Lenneke finds a basic, simple approach to techniques and materials very important to communicate her vision and her way of working. She prefers creating a family of products because as an only child she had always a desire for a bigger family. Her work is also known for the use of different shades of one color, and playing with the contrast between biscuit and glazed porcelain.Her love for curiosa, vintage and other remarkable items is showing in how she poetically displays her work in a bigger picture. She creates honest and harmonious designs, inspired by her own memories and found pieces from every day life. She feels her work should make people smile.

HEATH CERAMICS NEW SEASONAL COLLECTION

Moment-in-time creations which only are released in the summer and winter, this collection's theme is a winter at the beach. There are limited so if you love them, you need to snag them. 

The breakfast tea set is my personal favorite.  ABOUT HEATH:  Heath Ceramics was founded by another husband and wife team, Edith and Brian Heath.  When the duo moved from Chicago to San Francisco in the early 1940s, Edith—who’d had little formal training in the area—began making ceramics. In 1944, she held a one-woman exhibition at the Legion of Honor, where her work was noticed by Gump's, a respected design store in San Francisco. They commissioned Edith to create an exclusive dinnerware collection for them, and when more retail orders started coming in, the couple officially founded Heath Ceramics in Sausalito, California in 1948. In 1959, their business expanded into the factory which still houses our dinnerware manufacturing today. The building was designed in collaboration with the Heaths and Marquis and Stoller Architects. Edith designed her pieces for a single kiln-firing, at a lower-than-normal temperature, thus saving energy while producing a remarkably durable product. Her work led to advances in clay and glaze development, securing Heath a unique place in ceramic history, along with design awards including the Industrial Arts Award from the American Institute of Architects. Many of Edith’s original pieces are a part of the permanent collections of museums such as MOMA and LACMA.

The breakfast tea set is my personal favorite. 

ABOUT HEATH: 

Heath Ceramics was founded by another husband and wife team, Edith and Brian Heath. 

When the duo moved from Chicago to San Francisco in the early 1940s, Edith—who’d had little formal training in the area—began making ceramics. In 1944, she held a one-woman exhibition at the Legion of Honor, where her work was noticed by Gump's, a respected design store in San Francisco. They commissioned Edith to create an exclusive dinnerware collection for them, and when more retail orders started coming in, the couple officially founded Heath Ceramics in Sausalito, California in 1948.

In 1959, their business expanded into the factory which still houses our dinnerware manufacturing today. The building was designed in collaboration with the Heaths and Marquis and Stoller Architects.

Edith designed her pieces for a single kiln-firing, at a lower-than-normal temperature, thus saving energy while producing a remarkably durable product. Her work led to advances in clay and glaze development, securing Heath a unique place in ceramic history, along with design awards including the Industrial Arts Award from the American Institute of Architects. Many of Edith’s original pieces are a part of the permanent collections of museums such as MOMA and LACMA.

PATTERN PLAY // FOG LINEN WORK 

ABOUT THE MAKER // Yumiko Sekine started her first business in 1993 importing used books
and house ware from Europe and America to Japan.
In her search for more products, she could not find affordable every day linens
that she had used during her childhood.
She visited Lithuania, a country that grows flax, whose fibers are spun into linen,
and has been producing and exporting linen productsto
other European countries since the Middle Ages. 
She was disappointed to find that there were no linen products
for daily use available in the stores there.
This led her to contact several linen producers and started to have them
produce her own product designs in Lithuania.
Her first collection started with only seven items. Now after ten years, Fog Linen Work produces
a large line of linen products for the home and linen clothing.
Its products are leading and defining the natural life style trend in Japan today.
Sekine continues to be inspired to create beautiful simple products for daily use.

DOMINO MAGAZINE COVERS AUTUMN TABLE SETTINGS TO TRY RIGHT NOW

PHOTO COURTESY OF REMODELISTA.COM

PHOTO COURTESY OF REMODELISTA.COM